Ricotta Gnocchi with Prosciutto Crispy Sage and Pangrattato

Spring is here but I’m not ready to give up on comfort food yet. I really think you can get away with making gnocchi at any time of the year depending on which flavours you use and the other elements you pair it with. I’ve previously made sweet potato gnocchi with great success so I switched it up a bit and made this gnocchi using ricotta. It supposedly is one of the easier, more forgiving types of gnocchi to make. One thing that I am not sure of is the name ‘ricotta gnocchi’. I always thought that if you made gnocchi with ricotta you would call it ‘gnudi’. Still, I have seen it referred to as ‘gnocchi’ on many menus and recipes so if anyone has any information on the proper name, do let me know.

Call it ‘gnocchi’ or ‘gnudi’; or whatever you want…we just called it delicious! This dish was packed with spring flavours and was a lot of fun to make and eat.gnudi

This recipe from the Globe and Mail was the inspiration.

Spring Ricotta Gnocchi

Ingredients

1 lb fresh ricotta

1 egg

1 egg yolk

3/4 cup finely grated Parmesan reggiano cheese

1 tsp fresh nutmeg

1 1/2 tsp kosher salt, divided

3/4 cup all-purpose flour (this amount was no where near enough to form a decent dough, I probably doubled it)

5 to 6 tbsp extra virgin olive oil, divided

2 whole cloves garlic, peeled

1/2 cup bread crumbs

1/2 cup peas or fresh chick peas

5-6 pieces of proscuitto; sliced

a handful of sage leaves

butter

1 lemon, zested and juiced

salt and pepper for seasoning

Method

For the gnocchi, mix ricotta, egg, yolk, 1/2 cup Parmesan, nutmeg and 1 tsp salt until well combined. Mix in flour. Place dough on a floured work surface and knead for about 45 seconds to ensure ingredients are combined. Cover the dough with a large bowl or damp cloth and let it rest for 30 minutes.gnudi5

Divide the dough into 4 pieces. Roll each piece into 1/2-inch-thick rope on a floured work surface. Cut each cylinder into ½-inch pieces. (If desired, roll each piece on a gnocchi board to give it a dimpled and indented texture.) Bring a large saucepan of salted boiling water to a boil. Gently add gnocchi and cook for one minute after the gnocchi float to the water’s surface. Using a slotted spoon, remove the gnocchi.gnudi8

Fry the prosciutto until crispy. Remove from pan.

Add butter and fry sage leaves until they are crispy. Remove from pan.sage

To make the pangrattato, use the same pan and heat 2 tbsp of olive oil over medium-high. Add 1 garlic clove and fry until garlic begins to turn golden, then discard garlic. Add the bread crumbs and remaining salt to the pan and reduce heat to medium. Cook, stirring, until bread becomes golden, adding up to 1 tbsp more oil as needed. Transfer pangrattato to a plate and set aside.

Heat remaining olive oil in a large non-stick skillet over medium-high heat. Add remaining garlic clove, fry until golden and discard garlic. Add gnocchi to pan and shake gently to distribute. Fry, stirring occasionally, for 4 minutes or until the gnocchi turn golden, then add peas/fresh chick peas and toss and fry another couple of minutes. Transfer everything to a serving dish and add lemon zest, half the pangrattato and remaining pecorino. Toss to incorporate. Add lemon juice to taste and top with remaining pangrattato.

gnudi9

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This entry was posted by dishnthekitchen.

15 thoughts on “Ricotta Gnocchi with Prosciutto Crispy Sage and Pangrattato

  1. I have always been curious about fresh chickpeas and I see you used them here. I bought them a few years ago and didn’t really know what to do with them. This is fantastic! I must make this…

    • Funny story. I actually bought them and didn’t know what they were. The sign above them said they were fava beans but I knew that was wrong. So they were a mystery until I shelled them…and they just looked like chick peas to me. They are best when they are smallest, the larger ones aren’t as nice tasting.

  2. Pretty damn close to gnudi my friend. My understanding is that gnudi is more of a ricotta and spinach dumpling. A naked ravioli filling, if you will (gnudi meaning naked). Whatever it is it looks damn fine and I’m sure its taste equalled the appearance!!

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